Home

Apps & Demos

Image Viewing Clients

  • Diva.js

    Diva.js is an open-source document image viewer, especially suited for use in archival book digitization initiatives where viewing high-resolution images is a crucial part of the user experience. Using Diva, libraries, archives, and museums can present high-resolution document page images in a user-friendly “instant-on” interface that has been optimized for speed and flexibility.

  • IIPMooViewer

    IIPMooViewer is an open source, Javascript and HTML5 image streaming and zooming client. IIPMooViewer is IIIF-compatible and works with IIPServer or other IIIF compatible servers. Visit the IIP demo page to see the IIP viewers in action.

  • Mirador

    Mirador is an open source image, Javascript and HTML5 viewer that delivers high resolution images in a workspace that enables comparison of multiple images from multiple repositories. Mirador is fully IIIF-compatible. Visit the Mirador demo to see it in action.

  • OpenSeadragon

    OpenSeadragon is an open-source, Javascript viewer enabling smooth deep zoom and pan of high resolution images. OpenSeadragon is IIIF compatible. A demo of OpenSeadragon in action can be seen on the project homepage.

  • Leaflet-IIIF

    Leaflet-IIIF is a Leaflet plugin that enables zoomable IIIF images to be easily and quickly displayed. Leaflet + Leaflet-IIIF weigh in at just 35 KB and include great features like accessible keyboard controls and native touch/mobile support. Check out the demo

  • Universal Viewer

    The Universal Viewer is an open source project to enable cultural heritage institutions to present their digital artifacts in a IIIF-compliant and highly customisable user interface.

Image Servers

  • ContentDM

    ContentDM is a full-featured digital collection management system supported by OCLC that includes image hosting and metadata management.

    A Python-based translator has been produced that can make the images hosted in your ContentDM installation fully IIIF compatible.

  • Djatoka

    Djatoka is an open source, Java-based image server that provides compression and region extraction of JPEG 2000 images, URI-addressability of regions, and support for multiple image formats (including., BMP, GIF, JPG, PNG, PNM, TIF, JPEG 2000). Djatoka comes with a plug-in framework that allows transformations to be applied to regions and resolutions (e.g., watermarking).

    Djatoka is not natively IIIF-compatible. However, djatoka URI’s are easily translated to IIIF URI’s (for example see this Ruby on Rails gem that does the translation).

  • FSI Server

    There is a IIIF adaptor for FSI server.

    FSI Server is a popular commercial solution for serving high resolution images in multiple formats.  It accompanies the Flash-based FSI Viewer for zoom and pan.

  • IIPImage Server

    The IIPImage server is a high performance image server for streaming high resolution images. It supports advanced image features such as 16 and 32 bit color depths, floating point data, CIELAB colorimetric images and scientific imagery such as multispectral or hyperspectral images.

    The server is an Fast CGI module written in C++ that is designed to be embedded within a host web server such as Apache, Lighttpd, MyServer or Nginx.

    IIPImage server is IIIF compatible ( GitHub repo of the project).

  • Loris

    Loris is an open source, Python-based image server that supports the IIIF Image API ver 1.1. Loris supports JPEG and TIFF sources as well as JPEG2000.

  • digilib

    digilib is an open source, Java based image server for high resolution images. It supports the IIIF Image API and a native API that also allows brightness, contrast and color corrections and other operations.

    digilib supports JPEG, TIFF, PNG, JPEG2000 and other image formats via Java ImageIO. digilib also has a web client that offers continuous zoom, referenceable views, image annotations and other features for scholarly work.

Implementation Demos

  • Stanford University Libraries - Mirador demo

    This demo of Mirador, developed by the Stanford University Libraries, allows the user to compare images from several different image repositories, including the Stanford Digital Repository, Yale University and Los Alamos National Labs.

  • Princeton University Libraries

    This demonstration, hosted by the Princeton University Libraries, shows images being served by Loris and viewed using OpenSeadragon.

  • The British Library

    The British Library deployed a demonstration of Mirador that allows the user to compare images from the British Library, Yale University and Stanford University. The BL adapted Mirador to display a YouTube video within the viewer that can be played while inspecting images.

  • Biblissima - Mirador Demo

    The Biblissima Project is a hub for digital humanities projects in France that is focused on the written cultural heritage of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. They have an implementation of Mirador that currently shows content hosted at multiple institutions and will, increasingly, provide access to French content.