2024 IIIF Annual Conference Schedule

2024 IIIF Annual Conference Schedule

The outline schedules of the conference is available below. The exact timing of each day’s schedule is still subject to change.

Register

  • Please register for the conference using Conftool. Payment must be submitted following your registration via Paypal using a credit card number, or via check. You can register here.

  • Registration for the IIIF showcase is free.
  • Costs for the conference will be $495 for a general ticket, $255 for a consortium members ticket and $125 for students. Registration closes May 14, 2024.

Schedule

Conference:

Showcase:

  • Getty museum, Friday, June 7th

Sponsors

The IIIF Annual Conference is generously supported by the following Conference Sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor

Kakadu Software logo

Gold Sponsors

OCLC logo

Silver Sponsors

Cogapp logo Digirati logo Performant logo

Bronze Sponsors

Quire logo

Academic Partners

Getty Research Institute logo UCLA library logo

Conference

Day 1 - Tuesday, June 4th

The conference will take place in De Neve Auditorium on the UCLA campus.

Time Session Speaker(s)
8:30 - 9:00 Check-in
9:00 - 9:45 Welcome and State of the IIIF Universe IIIF Consortium Staff
09:45 - 10:00 IIIF 3D - Expanded Dimensions and Collaborative Scenes for Prezi 4.0 Ronald S. Haynes, other members IIIF 3D CG/TSG
10:00 - 10:15 Re-introducing Ramp: a IIIF Media Component Library Dananji Withana
10:15 - 10:30 Unlocking the richness of digitized map series with IIIF and Allmaps Bert Spaan, Jules Schoonman, Manuel Claeys Bouuaert, Martijn Meijers
10:30 - 10:45 Q & A
10:45 - 11:15 Break with tea and coffee
11:15 - 11:25 Re:tooling for education: IIIF from an educator’s perspective Ben Johnston, Chien-ling Zeleny
11:25 - 11:35 What if we OCR everything? John Moore
11:35 - 11:45 The Manifests are the Metadata: Exploring provenance through a manifest-led environment Anne McLaughlin
11:45 - 11:55 Biblioteca de la Universidad Intercultural de las Nacionalidades y Pueblos Indígenas Amawtay Wasi, ADRIANA GUANDINANGO
11:55 - 12:05 Internet Archive Support for IIIF: An Update Sara Brumfield
12:05 - 12:15 Fun With IIIF 2024 Tristan Roddis
12:15 - 12:30 Q & A
12:30 - 1:30 Lunch
01:30 - 01:40 The implementation of a rights-aware IIIF server at The New York Public Library Alessandra Genevie Reynosa Vertrees, Kristopher Kelly
01:40 - 01:50 Analytical Support Tools for Historical Drawing Maps: Utilization and Development of IIIF Georeference Extension and Mirador Plugin Satoru Nakamura, Taizo Yamada
01:50 - 02:00 Tropiiify: A Tropy plugin for exporting IIIF Collections Martim Passos, Bruno Buccalon, Yuri Tavares
02:00 - 02:10 Watch me spin up a production ready, lightning fast, IIIF image service in less time than it takes to give this talk Mat Jordan
2:10 - 2:30 Q & A
02:30 - 02:45 FloCo in the World: Indigenous Knowledge and Global Education Alicia Maria Houtrouw, Christopher J Gilman
02:45 - 03:00 Building the Digital Florentine Codex: From User Research to Production Matthew McGrattan
03:00 - 03:15 The (Feminist) Art of Integration: Judy Chicago's Archives and IIIF Dominique Luster, Binky Lush
3:15 - 3:30 Q & A
3:30 - 4:00 Break with tea and coffee
04:00 - 04:15 Using Booksnake to Teach with IIIF-Compliant Materials: Results from Classroom Testing Sean Fraga
10:00 - 12:00 IIIF & end-users: increasing uptake and creating ambassadors Evelien Hauwaerts, Nastasia Vanderperren
04:15 - 04:30 IIIF Manifest Editor - latest developments Tom Crane, Brittny Lapierre, John Baker
4:45 - 5:00 Q & A

Day 2 - Wednesday, June 5th

The conference will take place in De Neve Auditorium on the UCLA campus.

Time Session Speaker(s)
8:30 - 9:00 Registration and arrivals
09:00 - 09:15 Canvas Panel - a component for building IIIF user interfaces Tom Crane, Stephen Fraser
09:15 - 09:30 SCENE: a multi-user IIIF-driven environment for multimodal document analysis. Jacob Hart, David Rouquet, Clarisse Bardiot
09:30 - 09:45 Transdimensional mutations for audio/moving media annotations in IIIF Content Search Diego Alberto Pino Navarro, Allison Kelly Sherrick
09:45 - 10:00 Publishing and Annotating Text and Images in Large Historical Handwritten Text Recognition Collections Hennie Brugman, Bram Buitendijk, Hayco De Jong, Bas Leenknegt, Sebastiaan Van Daalen, Dirk Roorda
10:00 - 10:15 Dariah Media Hub - a large-scale solution for delivering IIIF images Marcin Heliński, Aleksandra Nowak
10:15 - 10:30 Q & A
10:30 - 11:00 Break with tea and coffee
11:00 - 11:15 Building Maktaba: A Digital Collection of African Arabic Manuscripts in Translation Carolyn Caizzi, Mat Jordan
11:15 - 11:30 Unlocking Treasures: The Urgency of IIIF Integration for Indonesia's Manuscript Legacy Faisal Huzein, Maliki Khoirul Ilman
11:30 - 11:45 Fostering Open Culture Globally: The Synergy between Creative Commons and IIIF in Cultural Heritage Institutions Timid Robot Zehta, Connor Benedict
11:45 - 12:00 Bridging Text and Space: Leveraging the IIIF Presentation Standard for a Better Understanding of Early Modern Archival Material Leon van Wissen, Lodewijk Petram, Jules Schoonman
12:00 - 12:15 Q & A
12:15 - 1:15 Lunch
01:15 - 01:25 Presentation Plus: Working at the Edges of the Presentation API Dan Brennan
01:25 - 01:35 DIY IIIF: A Sample of Standalone, Static, and Skunkworks Implementations Marii Nyrop
01:35 - 01:45 Handling special AV annotations: captions, subtitles, audio description, transcripts, and translations Emily Lynema, Mark Baggett, Nuno Freire
01:45 - 01:55 Integrating Clover IIIF viewer into collections management software CollectiveAccess Wai-Yin Kwan, Seth Kaufman, Adam Arling, Mat Jordan
1:55 - 2:05 To be confirmed
2:05 - 2:15 Q & A
02:15 - 02:30 CONTENTdm: Updated support for IIIF and expanding metadata management capabilities Shane Huddleston
02:30 - 02:45 Can you break it down for me?: IIIF for Managers Anne McLaughlin, Steven Archer
02:45 - 03:00 Nurturing Inclusive Access to GLAM Collections through Continuous Accessibility Testing and Community Engagement Brittny Lapierre
3:00 - 3:15 Q & A
3:15 - 3:45 Break with tea and coffee
03:45 - 04:00 Scrolling Along the Eastern Silk Roads: IIIF adapted to ancient scroll-format manuscripts Peter Pavement, Anastasia Pineschi
04:00 - 04:15 Creating a better balance: respectful reuse and AI/ML Tags in IIIF Manifests Allison Kelly Sherrick, Diego Alberto Pino Navarro
04:15 - 04:30 Possibilities and anxieties in IIIF-powered georeferencing of map collections Ian Spangler
4:30 - 4:45 Q & A
4:45 - 5:00 Wrap-up and thank yous IIIF Consortium Staff
6:30pm Conference Reception

Birds of a Feather sessions - Thursday, June 6th

The Birds of a Feather sessions will be held at the Charles Young Library.

Time Session 1 Session 2 Session 3
10:00 - 12:00 A/V Annotation IIIF & End Users: increasing uptake and creating ambassadors Connecting IIIF and Semantic Cultural Heritage Metadata for Discovery
12:00 - 1:30 Break
1:30 - 3:45 Where Next with IIIF Collections? Fish-of-a-School: IIIF for Educators
09:45 - 10:00

IIIF 3D - Expanded Dimensions and Collaborative Scenes for Prezi 4.0

Ronald S. Haynes, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom; other members IIIF 3D CG/TSG, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

To complement the growing impact of IIIF in 2D and Audio/Video (A/V) collections around the world, the 3D Technical Specification Group (TSG) is meeting frequently to advance a draft of standards for 3D content, to complement and expand the potential of all IIIF-based collections. In addition, the 3D Community Group (CG) shares significant projects, tools and contacts with other 3D researchers and developer communities to collaboratively consider challenges and potential solutions in common. The two IIIF 3D groups work together engaging with specialists and representatives across user communities, international and standards bodies, as outlined in their charters. The combined CG and TSG efforts are working to extend IIIF suitably into the 3rd dimension, expanding options for better data sharing across institutions and collections, to help overcome barriers for sustainable sharing. The TSG is determining workable options for incorporation of 2D and A/V with 3D data, including to enable digital dioramas (mini-metaverses), with considerations for scene and soundscape constructions, and the potential to help build a more inclusive and sustainable metaverse. This session will provide an update on the work and progress with use cases and technical specification drafting for the evolution of IIIF 3D. Please do join us!

Back to schedule


10:00 - 10:15

Re-introducing Ramp: a IIIF Media Component Library

Dananji Withana, Indiana University, United States of America

Formerly known as the IIIF React Media Player, Ramp is a IIIF viewer for audiovisual materials that supports the IIIF Presentation 3.0 API. It is an exportable NPM component library that provides ReactJS components for media playback, structures (table of contents) display, transcript presentation, metadata display, supplemental files, and highlighting annotations. A benefit of a component-based IIIF viewer is that individual implementations can choose which components to utilize and how to integrate them into their application. Ramp is now the primary media player for the Avalon Media System, providing nearly all item display functionality in Avalon.

In order to help community members with audiovisual media determine if Ramp would be useful for their needs, it has been added to the IIIF Viewer Matrix and has an up-to-date live demo site (https://ramp.avalonmediasystem.org/).

This presentation will provide an overview of Ramp and its constituent components and demonstrate how they are leveraged in the Avalon Media System. It will also provide an update on future work to broaden support for annotations and increase interoperability with AVAnnotate and Aviary, other producers of IIIF Presentation 3.0 manifests for audiovisual media.

Back to schedule


10:15 - 10:30

Unlocking the richness of digitized map series with IIIF and Allmaps

Bert Spaan, Allmaps; Jules Schoonman, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands; Allmaps; Manuel Claeys Bouuaert, Allmaps; Martijn Meijers, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Existing interfaces presenting digitized map series leave much to be desired. Navigation can be cumbersome and georeferenced versions break the link to the original image. The combination of IIIF’s Georeference Extension, the open source ecosystem Allmaps, and a group of ambitious students has yielded new methods for georeferencing map series and presenting them to a wider audience. This was achieved by transcribing historical sources about the series, converting geographic coordinates, using computer vision to detect the corners of the map depicted on the image, and publishing the results as Georeference Annotations.

By applying the methods to other map series in IIIF-compatible repositories, their reusability is demonstrated. New features such as thin plate spline transformation, distortion analysis to assess the accuracy of maps, and alternative map projections will pass in review, as well as suggestions for how to publish reusable information about map series as linked open data.

Last but not least, Allmaps Arcade is introduced, a playful interface to encourage public engagement with digitized map collections that can be configured with a specific map series and geographic area. Players are asked to place sheets in the right position and earn points based on speed and accuracy.

Back to schedule
11:15 - 11:25

Re:tooling for education: IIIF from an educator’s perspective

Ben Johnston, Princeton University; Chien-ling Zeleny, University of California, Los Angeles

The IIIF for Education Community Group is bringing together educators, academic technologists, librarians, instructional designers, museum professionals, and others to examine the ways IIIF resources and IIIF-related tools can be used as part of curriculum in Learning Management System (LMSs) and other online platforms to create meaningful, constructive, and collective learning experiences for students. Our development and implementation of course assignments making use of existing IIIF-enabled tools and resources has led us to consider them in light of three key aspects: teaching/pedagogy, assignment design, and campus infrastructure. In doing so, we hope to highlight best practices for teaching with IIIF tools and resources but also to identify current gaps in support for educators and to guide the development of new and existing tools. This lightning talk will highlight the tools that help to make these valuable experiences possible while also touching on potential areas for future development or adaptation to allow these tools and resources to play a more central role in teaching and learning.

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11:25 - 11:35

What if we OCR everything?

John Moore, The National Archives (UK), United Kingdom

There is a growing interest within cultural heritage organisations to understand the environmental impact of the infrastructure used to power the digital services accessed by the public. However, understanding the complexity behind this challenge involves breaking down the problem into well-defined and easily understood use cases that are common across the sector. At this point, we can begin to define the benchmarks, tools and techniques that help to generate data we require to start more informed discussions. The application of IIIF generates interesting use cases, such as the challenge of handling the large amounts of annotation data that result from the OCR of images at scale. In this talk, we will describe ongoing work to help understand this challenge and examine how the choice of technology can impact the digital footprint of a IIIF-related digital service. More specifically we will examine the performance of the annotation server Miiify against some repeatable benchmarks when applied to real-world data at scale. The goal is to share our findings and hopefully generate further discussion and sharing of best practices within the field of green computing.

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11:35 - 11:45

The Manifests are the Metadata: Exploring provenance through a manifest-led environment

Anne McLaughlin, Trinity College, Cambridge, United Kingdom

‘Provenance research only serves its purpose when it is made public. Flow of information, networking, exchange and accessibility are key terms which unfortunately still describe a Utopia’, begins Mahlo’s preface to the Provenance Research Manual. Faced with the challenge of making the provenance records connected to a recent acquisition the paper presents the results of a project to make it’s provenance records public, while in working in an entirely IIIF-native environment, with no external dependencies beyond an image server.

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11:45 - 11:55

Biblioteca de la Universidad Intercultural de las Nacionalidades y Pueblos Indígenas Amawtay Wasi,

ADRIANA GUANDINANGO, UNIVERSIDAD AMAWTAY WASI ECUADOR, Ecuador

La Biblioteca de la Universidad Intercultural de las Nacionalidades y Pueblos Indígenas Amawtay Wasi, es una unidad funcional de apoyo a la docencia, el aprendizaje y la investigación, que responde a los objetivos estratégicos de la Universidad y a su modelo pedagógico, alcanzando así la satisfacción total de las necesidades informativas de los usuarios (as) de la comunidad universitaria ofreciendo servicios bibliográficos de calidad.

La Biblioteca está constituida por los acervos bibliográficos y documentales en diferentes soportes, con independencia de su procedencia, de la iniciativa y el procedimiento para su adquisición y del concepto presupuestario aplicado para ésta.

Actualmente la Universidad está creando la Biblioteca con material bibliográfico enfocada a las nacionalidades ecuatorianas, es decir estamos recopilando libros, imágenes entorno a este temática, brindando de esta manera servicios de referencia, préstamos y digitalización.

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11:55 - 12:05

Internet Archive Support for IIIF: An Update

Sara Brumfield, FromThePage, United States of America

Last fall, Internet Archive staff and volunteers from the IIIF community brought IIIF support into the Internet Archive as a production service. We'll review what that support includes, show you how to use the over 50 million new resources, and provide an update on recent developments.

We'll finish with how you can help. There's some really interesting use cases left, and the Internet Archive is a great playground for experimenting with some of IIIF's emerging standards.

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12:05 - 12:15

Fun With IIIF 2024

Tristan Roddis, Cogapp, United Kingdom

It's time to play the music

It's time to light the lights

It's time to showcase entertaining aspects of image dissemination tonight!

It's time to get things started

On the most sensational inspirational, celebrational, IIIFational

This is what we call the Fun With IIIF Show!

Welcome to another round of the best, the wildest, the outright funnest things that the IIIF world has to offer. Triiistan Rodiiis will lead you on a whirlwind tour of over a dozen projects that prove that IIIF is not just about scholarship and research, but can also be about fun, frivolity and the kind of playfulness that is only truly possible once you have a suite of flexible and easy to use standards for image interoperability at your disposal.

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01:30 - 01:40

The implementation of a rights-aware IIIF server at The New York Public Library

Alessandra Genevie Reynosa Vertrees, The New York Public Library, United States of America; Kristopher Kelly, The New York Public Library, United States of America

Rights management at The New York Public Library (NYPL) is unique and complex, and the need to protect our assets was urgent while our resources were spread across multiple projects. In addition to copyright statuses, rights may be influenced by provenance, donor agreements, on site, off site access and specific research library guidelines. The sizes of images, whether or not they are available on the web or physically on site, only by request or not at all is governed by our rights management system. This presentation will discuss how the NYPL’s Digital Asset Management team created a rights-aware IIIF image server without using the IIIF Presentation and Authorization Flow APIs.

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01:40 - 01:50

Analytical Support Tools for Historical Drawing Maps: Utilization and Development of IIIF Georeference Extension and Mirador Plugin

Satoru Nakamura, The University of Tokyo, Japan; Taizo Yamada, The University of Tokyo, Japan

This proposal outlines the development of tools to support the comparison of historical maps using IIIF, initiated by the Historiographical Institute, the University of Tokyo. This project focuses on the integration and comparative analysis of Japan's national pictorial maps and other significant maritime maps from the 15th century onwards. By leveraging IIIF, the proposed tools aim to facilitate a deeper understanding of historical maritime routes and geographical knowledge. We have developed Mirador plugins that use annotations to structure information on place names and maritime routes within the maps, supporting the comparative analysis of common elements across multiple maps. Furthermore, we have constructed visualization tools compliant with the IIIF Georeference Extension, enabling researchers to compare historical maps with modern geographical data without distortion. By emphasizing open-source accessibility, these tools promise to enhance research capabilities within and beyond the IIIF community, offering new insights into historical navigation and cartography. This proposal highlights the importance of this work in preserving and studying historical maps, showcasing the potential for advanced research methodologies in historiography and digital humanities.

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01:50 - 02:00

Tropiiify: A Tropy plugin for exporting IIIF Collections

Martim Passos, Arka; Bruno Buccalon, Rice University; Yuri Tavares, Arka

In this talk we introduce Tropiiify, a plugin for exporting IIIF collections from Tropy, an open-source research photo management tool. Our plugin allows users to create, edit and export static IIIF collections through an intuitive user interface, with custom options for metadata schemas and annotations. Considering that serving IIIF assets on the web often requires extensive institutional support and server maintenance, we offer a straightforward alternative for small institutions and individuals without technical background to tile images and export their research materials following the IIIF specifications. The output is a file directory that can be hosted on GitHub Pages or other free hosting solutions, and fed into tools such as Canopy IIIF and Exhibit. The presentation will cover the project's history, use cases and feature roadmap.

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02:00 - 02:10

Watch me spin up a production ready, lightning fast, IIIF image service in less time than it takes to give this talk

Mat Jordan, Northwestern University Libraries

Serverless-IIIF started as an in-house project to solve Northwestern’s scaling needs with a focus on minimizing costs and operational overhead. The initial experiment has grown into a community project with production instances running at Princeton, Notre Dame, the Museums of Brighton and Hove, among others. It is well known that Serverless-IIIF offers implementers infinite scaling, inexpensive storage, and minimal operational overhead, but few have focused on exactly how easy it is to setup the service.

During this seven-minute lightning talk we will stand up a production-ready IIIF image service complete with storage, associated AWS Lambdas, and other requirements. In addition, we will discuss how serverless infrastructure works, why it is less expensive to run than traditional hosting for many IIIF workloads, and how serverless architecture can help you think about the environmental costs of computing.

That is a lot in seven minutes.

Back to schedule
02:30 - 02:45

FloCo in the World: Indigenous Knowledge and Global Education

Alicia Maria Houtrouw, Getty Research Institute; Christopher J Gilman, UCLA Library / Digital Library Program

The Florentine Codex is an exceptional sixteenth-century Mexican manuscript that was created by Spanish Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún and a team of Indigenous authors and artists. This encyclopedia of Nahua knowledge and language features three narratives: a primary Nahuatl text, a Spanish interpretation, and some 2,500 images. The codex is a key primary source on Nahua culture and the conquest of Mexico told from the Mexica perspective.

In 2016, the Getty Research Institute initiated a major collaborative initiative to transform the codex into an enhanced digital critical edition. Launched in 2023, the Digital Florentine Codex/Códice Florentino Digital (DFC) presents the newly digitized codex alongside its bilingual transcriptions and translations. Texts and images are searchable, achieved by tagging images with keywords. This image metadata is available in four languages—Classical Nahuatl, Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl, Spanish, and English—and was generated following a rigorous research process by an interdisciplinary team of scholars, including native Nahuatl speakers. Built using Digirati’s Canvas Panel as a bespoke IIIF viewer for images and texts, the DFC gives unprecedented access to this manuscript of human cultural heritage. This presentation will detail the collaborative process for this ambitious project and demonstrate the newly launched DFC.

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02:45 - 03:00

Building the Digital Florentine Codex: From User Research to Production

Matthew McGrattan, Digirati, United Kingdom

The Digital Florentine Codex is a richly enhanced digital critical edition of an exceptionally important 16th-century Mexican manuscript written in two languages—Nahuatl and Spanish—and richly illustrated throughout with nearly 2,500 individual images.

The Digital Florentine Codex site uses IIIF to present a browsable, searchable digital edition with multiple different scholarly transcriptions and translations of the original text along with images tagged and annotated with concepts from the Getty vocabularies in English, Spanish, Classical and Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl.

Presenting complex scholarly information while retaining an approachable, easy to use interface was both a design and a technical challenge.

This talk will outline the creation of the digital site from initial user research and user experience, through the information architecture and visual design, and outlining how IIIF and IIIF-enabled annotation tools and viewers were central to the curation of the source data and to the rich visual experience of the polished final site.

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03:00 - 03:15

The (Feminist) Art of Integration: Judy Chicago's Archives and IIIF

Dominique Luster, Pennsylvania State University Libraries, United States of America; Binky Lush, Pennsylvania State University Libraries, United States of America

This presentation will delve into the process of creating an aggregation of digital archives using IIIF. It will highlight the Judy Chicago Research Portal as a case study, focusing on the technical intricacies and collaborative dynamics involved in unifying diverse digitization implementations across five institutions. In just 15 minutes, we will discuss the challenges and successes of synchronizing varied digital practices to create a seamless and rich repository of feminist art. This session will provide practical strategies and innovative insights for leveraging IIIF in building expansive, interoperable digital collections. By examining the successful aggregation of distinct archival resources from across the country into a cohesive whole, attendees will be equipped with actionable knowledge to drive similar transformative projects in the realm of digital humanities.

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04:00 - 04:15

Using Booksnake to Teach with IIIF-Compliant Materials: Results from Classroom Testing

Sean Fraga, University of Southern California, United States of America

Interacting with digitized materials in a Web browser fails to replicate the embodied engagement possible during in-person research. To remedy this, we are building Booksnake, a new mobile app that transforms existing IIIF-compliant digitized materials into custom life-size virtual objects. Booksnake uses the augmented reality technology in consumer mobile devices to blend these virtual objects into a user's physical environment.

How can this technology support classroom teaching with IIIF-compliant materials? Systematic reviews show AR can support student learning gains, motivation, and knowledge transfer (Bacca et al. 2014). And embodied interaction is key to apprehending cultural heritage materials in their full complexity—both physical objects (Kai-Kee, Latina & Sadoyan 2020) and virtual replicas (Kenderdine and Yip 2019).

This presentation discusses results of large-scale classroom testing with Booksnake at the University of Southern California. Our central question is: Does interacting with archival materials in augmented reality change student learning outcomes, when compared with interacting with archival materials with a web-based viewer?

We use these results to identify potential educational implications for using augmented reality to interact with IIIF-compliant resources. We conclude with a set of best practices for using Booksnake to work with digitized sources in the physical space of a classroom.

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10:00 - 12:00

IIIF & end-users: increasing uptake and creating ambassadors

Evelien Hauwaerts, Bruges Public Library, Belgium; Nastasia Vanderperren, meemoo, Flemish institute for archives, Belgium

This session aims to offer tangible strategies and insights to increase the uptake of IIIF by end-users. For the most part, the available tutorials and training sessions focus on aspects (e.g., APIs or annotations) that require technical skills. The guides and tutorials for beginners on the Consortium’s website or GitHub are useful, but are also advanced in a sense that it takes a level of awareness about IIIF to visit a website dedicated to IIIF. So how can we reach the large masses of potential IIIF end-users. How can we promote the full potential of IIIF-compliant data? How can we create ambassadors within our institutions, regions and sectors?

The session will discuss the strategy of train-the-trainer workshops for end-users. The session will zoom in on one workshop in particular: the workshop that was developed for the Mmmonk project and that has been running since June 2022. It was designed by curators and data experts to stimulate the uptake of IIIF by end-users (i.e. create IIIF adopters), and to generate support and advocacy for IIIF (i.e. create IIIF ambassadors). The workshop is based on three principles to increase its effectiveness and appeal: teach only simple applications that require no technical skills, avoid technical jargon, and use relatable and inspiring examples and everyday scenarios. This approach puts into practice the recommendations by the D4H WG and the insights from the 2021 UX interviews on IIIF by Amy Deschenes et al.

Over the course of more than 15 workshops reaching over 300 participants, the workshop has evolved since its inception in 2022. We continuously integrated valuable feedback from participants, as well as relevant technical updates and innovations. Initially, the target audience were potential end-users in general, but in 2023 we decided to focus on staff working at GLAMs, academic institutions and industry associations due to the growing awareness that, even within institutions that have implemented IIIF, most collection managers, educators, communicators, photographers, administrators and even developers are not aware or only partially aware of what IIIF is and what the potential is for re-use of their digital images. Because this group could take up a key role as IIIF ambassadors, the workshop has been adapted with scenarios and examples tailored to their specific roles, while still avoiding any technical language or skills.

The session (2hrs) will consist of a train-the-trainer workshop (circa 60 minutes), followed by an open discussion based on insights gained from the Mmmonk workshop and other workshops (e.g., UK Research Libraries, BnF). To kick off the discussion and provide input for the further advancement of IIIF training and IIIF design, we will present the results of a quantitative survey on IIIF uptake conducted among the Mmmonk workshop participants.

Nastasia Vanderperren is IIIF expert at Meemoo, a non-profit organization that supports the digital archive operations of Flemish cultural, media and government organizations. Evelien Hauwaerts is medieval manuscripts curator at Bruges Public Library. They are both core members of the IIIF Network Association Flanders & Netherlands.

Back to schedule


04:15 - 04:30

IIIF Manifest Editor - latest developments

Tom Crane, Digirati; Brittny Lapierre, Canadian Research Knowledge Network; John Baker, Digirati

During 2022, in partnership with the UK Towards a National Collection project and Technical University, Delft, Digirati built a new open source IIIF Manifest Editor framework, that can accommodate many of the use cases for creating general purpose manifests, learning IIIF concepts, creating manifests for specific target environments and being easily integrated into diverse production workflows.

Now, in collaboration with Canadian Research Knowledge Network, Digirati are extending this framework to introduce a number of new features including creating collections, merging two manifests, creating multiple new Manifests from one very large existing Manifest, plus the selection, reordering and moving of canvases; and some general design and usability improvements.

In this presentation we will provide an overview of these features and dive into the underlying concepts and capabilities that facilitate them such as IIIF browsing, copy and paste, and storage.

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09:00 - 09:15

Canvas Panel - a component for building IIIF user interfaces

Tom Crane, Digirati; Stephen Fraser, Digirati

Canvas Panel is a Web Component that renders a IIIF Canvas and the annotations on it. It makes development of arbitrary IIIF apps easier with a “canvas-native” component that understands annotations as well as image services. A concise <canvas-panel> component on a web page renders one IIIF Canvas, and provides properties, events and functions to support user interaction with the content on the Canvas, as pure IIIF and web annotations.

Canvas Panel is not a viewer (not on its own, anyway) - it has no concept of digital objects, or IIIF Manifests and structure. But you can quickly build viewers with it, and we’ll show you some examples of this in this presentation.

Canvas Panel is to a IIIF Canvas as OpenSeadragon or Leaflet are to the IIIF Image API.

Documentation is at https://iiif-canvas-panel.netlify.app/docs/intro

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09:15 - 09:30

SCENE: a multi-user IIIF-driven environment for multimodal document analysis.

Jacob Hart, Université Rennes 2, France; David Rouquet, Tétras Libre; Clarisse Bardiot, Université Rennes 2, France

In this paper, we present SCENE - a multi-user IIIF-driven environment for multimodal document analysis. SCENE builds on a fork of Mirador where we add support for video and audio resources. We couple this to a powerful Mirador annotation plugin that supports annotation of AV documents as textual annotations, visual overlays, time-linked annotations, and links to other Manifests. All of this is available as a multi-user web environment, where anyone with an email can sign up and start creating, consulting and annotating IIIF format content free of charge. In this paper we shall present the development process, as well as a number of case studies in various digital humanities fields that drove development. We shall also discuss some of our plans to render the environment fully open with a RESTful API, allowing SCENE to engage with machine learning and artificial intelligence-based workflows, and other IIIF-driven projects.

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09:30 - 09:45

Transdimensional mutations for audio/moving media annotations in IIIF Content Search

Diego Alberto Pino Navarro, Metropolitan New York Library Council, United States of America; Allison Kelly Sherrick, Metropolitan New York Library Council, United States of America

This technical presentation will focus on how Archipelago, an OSS Repository system developed by the Metropolitan New York Library council for the past 5 years that integrates IIIF tightly in all its concerns, allows time based Audio and Video, transcripts, to be converted natively into W3C compliant Annotations for its internal IIIF Content Search discovery (Version 1 and 2) APIs, by mutating back and forth temporal dimensions into spatial ones (x,y), encoding and storing them as discoverable OCR in MiniOCR format into a backend Solr Server. This approach allows us to reuse the OCR Highlight plugin developed by the Bavarian State Library Team which already powers textual annotations of image based resources and thus reuse all the supporting code that drives our ingest, pre and post processing workflows and discovery.

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09:45 - 10:00

Publishing and Annotating Text and Images in Large Historical Handwritten Text Recognition Collections

Hennie Brugman, KNAW Humanities Cluster, Netherlands, The; Bram Buitendijk, KNAW Humanities Cluster, Netherlands, The; Hayco De Jong, KNAW Humanities Cluster, Netherlands, The; Bas Leenknegt, KNAW Humanities Cluster, Netherlands, The; Sebastiaan Van Daalen, KNAW Humanities Cluster, Netherlands, The; Dirk Roorda, KNAW Humanities Cluster, Netherlands, The

The spectacular increase in quality and availability of Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) produces large historical collections of scanned images with matching HTR transcriptions. At KNAW Humanities Cluster we process and publish several of such collections, a.o. 17th-18th century Resolutions of the Dutch States General (parliament) and 5 million pages from the archives of the Dutch East India Company. For both collections the scans are provided by the Dutch National Archive, using IIIF.

To prepare these texts for research we need a far more complex text model than simply treating text as a collection of strings associated with image regions on scans or canvases.

The paper discusses the Text Model and IIIF-inspired Text Referencing API that we designed, implemented and applied for a range of projects. It also covers how we use IIIF, the Text API and Web Annotations to publish our collections online.

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10:00 - 10:15

Dariah Media Hub - a large-scale solution for delivering IIIF images

Marcin Heliński, Poznan Supercomputing and Networking Center, Poland; Aleksandra Nowak, Poznan Supercomputing and Networking Center, Poland

Poznan Supercomputing and Networking Center is one of leading players in the European Research Area, specializing in IT infrastructure for science and information technologies. Collaborating with cultural heritage and digital humanities researchers for over 20 years, PSNC developed DInGO software, widely used for digitization and archiving. Recently, PSNC has focused on IIIF technology, integrating it into DInGO and developing the Virtual Transcription Laboratory (VTL) for document transcription.

Cooperation with Europeana and other European partners in projects like EnrichEuropeana and EnrichEuropeana+ further improved PSNC's IIIF capabilities which were important in completing DARIAH-PL. This initiative resulted in the development of Dariah Media Hub, addressing researchers' need for optimized data delivery. Supporting various file formats, including images, PDFs, audio, video, and 3D materials, the hub internally converts files to IIIF-compliant image format allowing storage and access. Its scalable infrastructure, utilizing Cantaloupe IIIF servers, ensures efficient data handling.

In our presentation we will provide details of Dariah Media Hub's extensive infrastructure for IIIF image service and showcase functionality utilizing IIIF related frameworks and APIs.

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11:00 - 11:15

Building Maktaba: A Digital Collection of African Arabic Manuscripts in Translation

Carolyn Caizzi, Northwestern University Libraries, United States of America; Mat Jordan, Northwestern University Libraries, United States of America

The Building Maktaba project aims to make accessible 7,000 African Arabic manuscripts provided from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) and Northwestern University (NU). In the first steps of the National Endowment for the Humanities-funded pilot project, twenty select items demonstrate a IIIF-focused solution that unify the manuscripts from both institutions, annotate them with Arabic transcriptions, English translations, and contextual essays, provide them as a single IIIF Collection, and publish IIIF content and associated scholarly work to a statically generated site using Canopy IIIF. Visitors to the public Maktaba collection site will find a unified browsable collection of annotated manuscripts along with scholarly essays analyzing the manuscripts. The workflows, tools, and techniques presented can be adopted by Digital Humanities projects combining IIIF collections with scholarly output.

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11:15 - 11:30

Unlocking Treasures: The Urgency of IIIF Integration for Indonesia's Manuscript Legacy

Faisal Huzein, Perpustakaan Nasional, Indonesia; Maliki Khoirul Ilman, Perpustakaan Nasional, Indonesia

In the heart of Indonesia, where 22,700 precious manuscripts have been digitized across the country, a digital treasure trove remains untapped. The National Library of the Republic of Indonesia (NLRI) safeguards 6,066 of these manuscripts, yet their presentation lacks the vigor and accessibility needed to engage a global audience. Our proposal, "Unlocking Treasures," passionately advocates for the urgent integration of the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) to revitalize Indonesia's manuscript legacy.

Keywords: IIIF Integration, Manuscript Presentation, Cultural Heritage, Digital Accessibility

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11:30 - 11:45

Fostering Open Culture Globally: The Synergy between Creative Commons and IIIF in Cultural Heritage Institutions

Timid Robot Zehta, Creative Commons, United States of America; Connor Benedict, Creative Commons, United States of America

In the ever-evolving landscape of cultural heritage, the intersection of Creative Commons (CC) and the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) stands as a pivotal force, propelling the global movement towards open culture. This session seeks to deepen the dialogue between these crucial components of the Open Culture Infrastructure, bringing together active participants from cultural heritage institutions worldwide. The focus is on fostering collaborative discussions that address critical issues such as copyright, licensing, and the strategic steps involved in transitioning towards an open paradigm.

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11:45 - 12:00

Bridging Text and Space: Leveraging the IIIF Presentation Standard for a Better Understanding of Early Modern Archival Material

Leon van Wissen, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Lodewijk Petram, Huygens Institute, The Netherlands; Jules Schoonman, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Incorporating additional artifacts such as maps is essential to fully unlock the Dutch East India Company's (VOC) vast paper archives (1605-1799). While letters, reports, and ledgers offer historical insights, identifying the toponyms they mention proves challenging due to shifting place names.

The GLOBALISE project tackles this challenge by connecting the massive textual corpus of VOC archives with colonial maps, thereby enhancing the understanding and interpretation of these spatial references in the written archives. This approach involves three layers, each resulting in a set of web annotations that are combined according to the IIIF Presentation standard:

1. Georeferencing using the Allmaps tool, superimposing the early modern view of colonies onto modern maps.

2. Detecting toponyms by recognizing and transcribing labels from maps, and linking them to places mentioned in written archives and external resources.

3. Classifying geospatial iconography such as icons and symbols representing settlements, plantations, and more, advancing our understanding of the early modern Dutch colonial view of the world.

By weaving together text and maps, GLOBALISE allows researchers to better interpret spatial references in archival documents, and thus better understand (Dutch) colonial history and its impact on geopolitics. Publishing its enrichments via IIIF standards ensures open access and collaboration.

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01:15 - 01:25

Presentation Plus: Working at the Edges of the Presentation API

Dan Brennan, J. Paul Getty Trust, United States of America

In support of a planned exhibition opening in Spring 2024, the Getty Digital team undertook a project to present a photo album that had been disassembled and digitized in pieces as a reconstituted digital object through IIIF. Though this type of "bring the illumination back to the manuscript page" example has existed since the early days of the IIIF Presentation API, this talk will cover some of the practical challenges involved in producing the resources necessary to implement it and the end result of the project as a set of tools and workflows, as well as highlight the present state of the development of a new image viewer at Getty to support an extended set of presentation use cases.

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01:25 - 01:35

DIY IIIF: A Sample of Standalone, Static, and Skunkworks Implementations

Marii Nyrop, New York University, United States of America

Not all IIIF needs to be institutional-grade or institutionally-stewarded. What about the public librarian who wants to publish a digital collection on GitHub pages? The digital humanist between jobs with a great idea for an exhibit? Or the research engineer who wants to support a handful of projects without managing an image server or going through library acquisitions?

This lightning talk will provide a few examples of "DIY IIIF'' projects as models for starting from scratch. We'll look at static sites on the histories of Occupy Wall Street and the Chicano Studies Library with self-contained IIIF Level 0 resources. We'll also inspect a GitHub-based workflow (Aperitiiif) for quickly publishing IIIF collections for research. In the process, we'll consider how to lower structural barriers to supporting IIIF independently of the proverbial man 🤘

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01:35 - 01:45

Handling special AV annotations: captions, subtitles, audio description, transcripts, and translations

Emily Lynema, Indiana University, USA; Mark Baggett, University of Tennessee, USA; Nuno Freire, Europeana Foundation, The Netherlands

Members from the IIIF A/V Community Group have identified use cases for IIIF clients that require new mechanisms in order to identify and enable specific functionality in IIIF viewers for annotations that contain captions, subtitles, audio description, transcripts and translations. Key use cases include distinguishing between captions/subtitles, which should be available to display over top of a video, and transcripts, which should be displayed in a separate widget for search and download. Accessibility requirements are an important component, and audio description tracks that contain descriptions of important visual information should also be made clearly available to users in IIIF viewers. Potentially relevant for use cases outside of A/V, content owners may also want to clearly distinguish between transcriptions and translations across formats, including newspapers and manuscripts.

The IIIF AV Annotations Technical Specification Group was formed to address these use cases and is currently discussing possible extensions and/or revisions for the IIIF Presentation API with the IIIF Editorial Board. This lightning talk aims to share the results of these conversations and trigger discussions in other IIIF communities that may have similar use cases for annotations in IIIF resources.

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01:45 - 01:55

Integrating Clover IIIF viewer into collections management software CollectiveAccess

Wai-Yin Kwan, Whirl-i-Gig, United States of America; Seth Kaufman, Whirl-i-Gig, United States of America; Adam Arling, Northwestern University; Mat Jordan, Northwestern University

CollectiveAccess is an open-source collections management application used by hundreds of projects. To meet the needs of disparate collections, it supports a wide range of media including IIIF images, video, audio, 3D, and PDFs. Many users also describe their holdings through captioning and annotation of media. In winter 2023, we started working with Grand Rapids Public Library to add to CollectiveAccess new search and display capabilities for their newspapers collection. This newspaper viewer had to provide support for PDFs and METS/ALTO files, text search with highlighting of search terms, page/issue/publication navigation, as well as seamless integration with the rest of the library collection. After considering various multimedia viewer options, we arrived at a standards-based solution leveraging IIIF protocols and Clover IIIF Viewer.

We collaborated with developers from Northwestern University Libraries to integrate annotations, Content Search 2.0, and newspapers from the IIIF standards and cookbook recipes for both software projects. We also contributed features not covered by IIIF specs, such as custom CSS styles and PDF support via a custom display. We hope our collaboration can show how open-source projects can work together to meet the needs of collections that have different types of media and use cases.

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02:15 - 02:30

CONTENTdm: Updated support for IIIF and expanding metadata management capabilities

Shane Huddleston, OCLC

As libraries, archives, and museums continue to transition to linked data, there is the need for managing both structural metadata and descriptive metadata. In this session, we will discuss the structural IIIF linked data developments happening in CONTENTdm as well as the descriptive metadata linked data advancements we are making. Together, these technology solutions will help data curators better manage, share, and reuse digital materials.

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02:30 - 02:45

Can you break it down for me?: IIIF for Managers

Anne McLaughlin, Trinity College, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Steven Archer, Trinity College, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Existing IIIF literature describes how to introduce IIIF to engineers and deans, researchers, and CIOs, but, as IIIF has become more established in the last decade, there is little literature about the management of legacy systems as well as the need to manage people who are responsible for keeping them afloat. In essence, this paper seeks to address that gap, presenting a possible framework for ‘IIIF for Managers’, designed to assist those who are responsible for their staff who are engaged in the maintenance, creation and implementation of IIIF resources, yet lack the specific expertise held by those that they manage.

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02:45 - 03:00

Nurturing Inclusive Access to GLAM Collections through Continuous Accessibility Testing and Community Engagement

Brittny Lapierre, Canadian Research Knowledge Network, Canada

The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) has played a pivotal role in advancing the accessibility and interoperability of digital resources in the cultural heritage sector. IIIF powered digital image viewers, such as Mirador and Universal Viewer, have become integral components in the dissemination of open scholarly research, playing a critical role in presenting and sharing digital collections of Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums (GLAM) institutions worldwide. Despite their widespread adoption, there is a need to ensure that these viewers adhere to accessibility standards, making them usable by individuals with diverse abilities. By addressing accessibility concerns, we not only adhere to ethical principles but also unlock the full potential of these viewers for a broader audience.

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03:45 - 04:00

Scrolling Along the Eastern Silk Roads: IIIF adapted to ancient scroll-format manuscripts

Peter Pavement, Surface Impression; Anastasia Pineschi, The British Library

In the early 20th century, Mogao Cave 17 near Dunhuang, China, was opened up, revealing thousands of manuscripts, documents, paintings and more that had lain undisturbed since their 11th century concealment. These artefacts, compared to the Dead Sea Scrolls in significance, were dispersed across global institutions by early 1900s explorers from colonial powers.

In the 90s, the International Dunhuang Programme (IDP) formed; uniting 42 partners to conserve, catalogue, and digitize Eastern Silk Road collections – including the Dunhuang finds. 30 years later, cultural sector digital specialists Surface Impression were tasked with updating the now woefully outdated IDP website to greatly enhance access to these worldwide collections.

IIIF was key to the new development, given its ability to reunite dispersed items. But there was a catch! Scroll-format manuscripts number over 20,000 items, including the 5 metre (16.5’) wide Diamond Sutra (a 200:1 aspect ratio).

This presentation explores creative and technical strategies for diverse and often awkwardly sized materials within IIIF. It will examine how the IIIF community can innovate display methods while maintaining interoperability. It will be wide ranging and exploratory - including design, tech, viewers, curatorship and managing a complex digital project while under extreme pressure from external events!

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04:00 - 04:15

Creating a better balance: respectful reuse and AI/ML Tags in IIIF Manifests

Allison Kelly Sherrick, Metropolitan New York Library Council, United States of America; Diego Alberto Pino Navarro, Metropolitan New York Library Council, United States of America

We are living through yet another transformative era when the fundamental drivers of Internet content creation, curation, and reuse are shifting as massive AI and ML applications reform our shared digital landscape. In response to these shifting sands, we need to rethink the ways we can best provide quality research and reuse interactions for our richly described content shared through IIIF APIs and related Manifests. The unregulated consumption of data and resources by AI-powered bots and harvesters is increasingly more tenuous and challenges our well established ideas of what openness means. We propose the implementation of standardized “no-AI'' or “regulated AI” tags in IIIF Manifests that could be applied in repository environments across the globe. Similar to the initiatives crafted by other creative content communities to limit the scraping of images and text using “noai” and “noimageai” meta HTML tags, we propose that the IIIF Community considers implementing a set of tags within the standard IIIF API frameworks to help better regulate AI/ML content scraping and non-consented or attributed use of IIIF powered content in AI/ML applications. We strongly believe in the value of creating consensus and shared practices in our own community for combating this significant challenge.

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04:15 - 04:30

Possibilities and anxieties in IIIF-powered georeferencing of map collections

Ian Spangler, Leventhal Map & Education Center, United States of America

Georeferencing, or the ability to match scanned images of maps to their real-world geographies, has become an increasingly desirable workflow at map-holding institutions. The Allmaps software ecosystem uses WebGL and IIIF to warp maps on the client side of a web browser, reducing many of the barriers to georeferencing that are inherent to traditional desktop georeferencing (e.g., ArcGIS, QGIS). While Allmaps represents a next-generation tool for georeferencing, it is not a panacea. In this presentation, we reflect on frictions that we’ve encountered when discussing Allmaps as a georeferencing solution with other map-holding institutions, including its possibilities and the anxieties it raises for prospective users. We begin with a brief overview of the Allmaps software ecosystem, drawing concrete examples from the LMEC case to highlight possibilities for using Allmaps with digital map collections. Then, we highlight three anxieties that are commonly encountered when proposing Allmaps as a georeferencing solution at other institutions. By way of conclusion, we sketch out a governance structure for Allmaps - and potentially for other software projects that use IIIF - that might ease some of these anxieties for prospective users.

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10:00 - 12:00

A/V Annotation Birds of a Feather Meeting

Ben Brumfield, FromThePage, United States of America; Tanya Clement, University of Texas-Austin

IIIF has allowed annotation of images for years, but with the addition of audio-visual support with version 3.0, a world of new possibilities opens up. However, A/V annotations go well beyond a textual body targeting a region of a painting -- established usages such as captioning, subtitling, and speaker diarization come into contact with scholarly annotation for film studies or oral history. In addition, the WebAnnotation technical specification must interoperate with established standards like WebVTT or OHMS.

This meeting will discuss the range of annotation practices for A/V and connect practitioners as they navigate implementing them in IIIF.

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10:00 - 12:00

IIIF & end-users: increasing uptake and creating ambassadors

Evelien Hauwaerts, Bruges Public Library, Belgium; Nastasia Vanderperren, meemoo, Flemish institute for archives, Belgium

This session aims to offer tangible strategies and insights to increase the uptake of IIIF by end-users. For the most part, the available tutorials and training sessions focus on aspects (e.g., APIs or annotations) that require technical skills. The guides and tutorials for beginners on the Consortium’s website or GitHub are useful, but are also advanced in a sense that it takes a level of awareness about IIIF to visit a website dedicated to IIIF. So how can we reach the large masses of potential IIIF end-users. How can we promote the full potential of IIIF-compliant data? How can we create ambassadors within our institutions, regions and sectors?

The session will discuss the strategy of train-the-trainer workshops for end-users. The session will zoom in on one workshop in particular: the workshop that was developed for the Mmmonk project and that has been running since June 2022. It was designed by curators and data experts to stimulate the uptake of IIIF by end-users (i.e. create IIIF adopters), and to generate support and advocacy for IIIF (i.e. create IIIF ambassadors). The workshop is based on three principles to increase its effectiveness and appeal: teach only simple applications that require no technical skills, avoid technical jargon, and use relatable and inspiring examples and everyday scenarios. This approach puts into practice the recommendations by the D4H WG and the insights from the 2021 UX interviews on IIIF by Amy Deschenes et al.

Over the course of more than 15 workshops reaching over 300 participants, the workshop has evolved since its inception in 2022. We continuously integrated valuable feedback from participants, as well as relevant technical updates and innovations. Initially, the target audience were potential end-users in general, but in 2023 we decided to focus on staff working at GLAMs, academic institutions and industry associations due to the growing awareness that, even within institutions that have implemented IIIF, most collection managers, educators, communicators, photographers, administrators and even developers are not aware or only partially aware of what IIIF is and what the potential is for re-use of their digital images. Because this group could take up a key role as IIIF ambassadors, the workshop has been adapted with scenarios and examples tailored to their specific roles, while still avoiding any technical language or skills.

The session (2hrs) will consist of a train-the-trainer workshop (circa 60 minutes), followed by an open discussion based on insights gained from the Mmmonk workshop and other workshops (e.g., UK Research Libraries, BnF). To kick off the discussion and provide input for the further advancement of IIIF training and IIIF design, we will present the results of a quantitative survey on IIIF uptake conducted among the Mmmonk workshop participants.

Nastasia Vanderperren is IIIF expert at Meemoo, a non-profit organization that supports the digital archive operations of Flemish cultural, media and government organizations. Evelien Hauwaerts is medieval manuscripts curator at Bruges Public Library. They are both core members of the IIIF Network Association Flanders & Netherlands.

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10:00 - 12:00

Connecting IIIF and Semantic Cultural Heritage Metadata for Discovery

Robert Sanderson, Yale University, United States of America; Julien Raemy, University of Basel; Kevin Page, Oxford University; Daniel Sissman, J Paul Getty Trust; Claire Knowles, University of Leeds; Tom Crane, Digirati

Many of the core use cases of IIIF have been expressed not in terms of images and their presentation, but in terms of the digitized cultural heritage items. It has long been desirable to discover resources digitally available via IIIF by searching the properties and relationships of the real world objects, such as by creator, subject, classification or date. This Birds of a Feather session will discuss how organizations are using the Linked Art specification in conjunction with IIIF to obtain significant benefits through the joint adoption of these highly usable standards.

Linked Art has been designed and implemented over the past 5 years learning from and intentionally following the community best practices and design principles that IIIF has demonstrated to be so effective. It uses an existing, standard conceptual model and encodes knowledge using shared patterns in JSON-LD, made available via an easy to publish and consume web API. It has been adopted internationally by cultural heritage research and collecting institutions. We shall also discuss implementation experience and tools, and how to ensure the continued and rich connection between these overlapping communities and specifications.

Links:

* https://linked.art/

* https://lux.collections.yale.edu/

* https://www.getty.edu/art/collection/

* https://vangoghworldwide.org/

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1:30 - 3:45

Where next with IIIF Collections?

Neil Hawkins, Cogapp, United Kingdom

A IIIF “collection” is a group of manifests (including other collections), and the idea has been present since version 2.0 of the Presentation API.

However, it feels like the uptake of modelling data in this way has been slow to take off, arguably because there are very few systems that can reliably and usefully process this kind of grouped, hierarchical information.

In this Birds of a Feather session I would like to make contact with other people who have considered IIIF collections to model their data, but have been put off by a lack of capable systems to display that information. We will discuss what the potential use cases are for using IIIF collections, followed by collectively forming a proposal for how they could be better represented by the standard viewers or alternative online systems.

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1:30 - 3:45

Fish-of-a-School: IIIF for Educators

Christopher J Gilman, UCLA Library / Digital Library Program, United States of America; Ben Johnston, Princeton University / McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning

Crows have murder and geese their gaggle. Birds of a feather, in other words, have their flocks, while educators and fish of a scale school separately. The newly-formed IIIF Community Group for Education seeks more of its kind and welcomes others to explore yet unmapped seas below the surface of IIIF’s global purview, for there be dragons. A weekly working group has caught the odd fish or two, and we are casting our net more widely: for seasoned IIIF toolmakers, collectors, and standard-bearers who’d like to scale up to a bigger market; and IIIF-ish educators, instructional designers, and academic technologists at the farthest reaches of the GLAM sector.

The IIIF Community Group for Education represents educators, educational institutions, and cultural heritage institutions with educational functions as a group with coherent interests to be addressed in outreach and in the development of IIIF standards and related technologies. The group, with members from across the community and around the world, focuses on the creative and productive uses of IIIF resources and IIIF-enabled tools for teaching and learning. The group seeks to address the needs of educators, potentially one of the largest and most engaged audience for IIIF content, and recognizes the potential positive impact of IIIF-enabled resources and tools for experiential and active learning. Leveraging capacities of the broader IIIF community, the IIIF Community Group works to inspire the development of new tools that reflect the needs of educators and to serve as a focal point for knowledge-sharing among educators interested in using IIIF as part of coursework. The group welcomes instructors, academic technologists, and anyone else involved with the integration of IIIF tools and resources within the context of education or educational outreach.

Areas of focus include:
- Familiarity with IIIF as a matter of information literacy
- Curriculum and lesson plan sharing highlighting the many ways that IIIF tools and resources can be used as part of creative course assignments
- Document and develop IIIF-based instructional tools for teaching and learning, such as tools for the creation of “teaching collections”, additional tools for annotation and writing, and tools for digital exhibit creation.
- Identifying gaps and institutional needs, including IT infrastructure, instructional and academic technology support, in a wide spectrum of institution types.

This “fish-of-a-school” session will provide an overview of the group's current work, goals for the future, and serve as a space of networking for educators and education-related professionals, as well as a session of brainstorming to determine the immediate needs of educators. Participation in this session or in the related Community Group does not presuppose any technical skills or proficiencies. All are welcome.

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